SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
The iconic mosque Dubai Emaar Spans associates.jpg
Emaar Properties SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
ELEVATION SHORT
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SECTION SHORT
ROOF PLAN
PLAN UPPER FLOOR WOMEN
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SECTION LONG diag.jpg
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SECTION LONG
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
Iranian-Calligraphy
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
EMAAR PROPERTIES SPANS.jpg
SPANS associates - Nicolas Sterling - Elke Sterling Presser - The Iconic Mosque - Dubai - Creek Harbour - Architect Engineer - concept 01, ns_spans
The iconic mosque Dubai Emaar Spans associates.jpg

THE ICONIC MOSQUE, DUBAI

Project: Mosque

Location: Dubai, UAE

Date: 2018

Client: Emaar Properties

Architect: SPANS associates

Concept Engineer: SPANS associates

Renderings: Render Art

www.renderart.eu

Type: Sacred space - Mosque

Stage: Competition

 

Design and Concept

CONCEPT

The Iconic Mosque at Dubai Creek Harbour creates a dynamic open movement. Originated from the centre of the Creek Tower, the landscape radial lines and Mosque building are integrated in a continuous flow. The project has a unique identity within a sequential landscape in continuity of the Creek Tower masterplan. The elegant cable geometry stabilising the Creek Tower, guides the verticality towards the sky and delivers a gracious dynamism. The Mosque is similarly creating a vibrant movement to the horizontal within a gradual terraced landscape as an open public space to contemplate and pray.
With a total capacity of 7500 worshippers internally, the Mosque is a urban signal. It has an accessible roof with a capacity to take 2000 worshippers. The internal space is envisaged as a retreat from the rest of urban city. It is essentially aiming at creating an inner shell, one that reflects the journey to the spiritual, oriented to Mecca. The golden sacred shiny dome is forming an intimate deep crystalline inner space for the self exposed to the light of knowledge.
The whole project is designed as a sustainability and engineeringlandmark. The form of the building itself is made of environmental design concept, and aiming that all energy is self sufficient on site, including natural light, ventilation and water cooling. The Mosque is using traditionnal technics and state of the art engineering, with local resources, efficient material, form finding technics to optimise the long span high performance concrete structure.

Creek Harbour + Creek Tower

The centrepiece of the current masterplan
project is Dubai Creek Tower, which at 928m
is set to stand 100m higher than Burj Khalifa.
The tower takes design inspiration from the
lily flower and evokes the image of a minaret.
It has an elongated oval-shaped bud that will
have some of the world’s highest observation
decks offering 360 degrees panoramic views
of the city. The site is situated on the banks
of the historic Dubai Creek.
Mosque masterplan connection
The Dubai Creek Harbour Mosque is a unique
opportunity to create a sacred place and a sequential
landscape in continuity of the Creek
Tower masterplan.The project does orientate
the whole area, the city and beyond, and is
shaped as a continuous landscape to form a
urban integrated project.
Symetric and radial landscape
The symmetry of the whole landscape and
the radial grid define the continuity with the
tower masterplan. The green areas, the water
features, and the outdoor praying areas are
developped within these lines, and a transversal
grid formed by bridges and tiling create
a secondary network according to Mecca
direction.

A minaret and grid to Mecca

The front inclined Minaret provides finally a
signal and an guiding orientation.
All the transversal bridges and circulation in
the landscape are perpendicular to the Mecca
direction and refere to the scared orientation.

Tower geometry

The elegant “cable drape” stabilising the
Creek Tower, designed by Santiago Calatrava,
guides the verticality of the icon to the sky
and delivers a gracious dynamism between
the verticality and the horizontality.
Urban dialogue
The Mosque responds to the tower identity
in a dynamic move from the horizontal landscape.
From the centre of the tower, the lines
of the landscape and mosque are integrated
in a continuous flow.

A bridge between two scales

The project is a bridge between the quest of
urban centre and the inner self and believes
of each of the living Muslims. The symmetry
of the building shape and plaza provides
an order and orientates the site. The mosque
building and the whole landscape area are
integrated into one project. It is the space between
them that fabricates a city. The project
itself is actually envisaged as a piece of
the city. It does include, water feature, terraces,
trees and steps to reach the main praying
Hall. Visitors’ first impression is a unique
park landscape with axial radial promenade
and public space: the gradual landscape becomes
a stepped roof reaching a top platform.
It does offer a unique view on the whole harbour
pointing the minaret tower, and a symbolic
place to contemplate and pray. Friday
prayers can spill outside on the terraces, the
plaza and further along the main gardens.
Gold sacred icon and symbol
The golden round dome shape of the main
prayer hall creates an important identification
for the iconic sacred place. The sacred
space is protected by layers and intermediate
spaces. The overall shape connects as
a urban signal and covers and protects the
space within.

Iconic shell mass

The outer shell is a performent concrete structure
that doubles on the sacred space area to
create a circulation and an ventilation cavity.
It provides to the shape inertia and minimise
the weight. The concrete cavity and thin
concrete walls benefit as well to the thermal
mass in hot conditions to minimise condition
heat gains.

Large open public space

The Dubai Creek Harbour Mosque is shaped
as a continuous landscape to form a urban integrated
project. The ground level is an open
public space that allow pedestrian to pass
through following the symmetry. It does minimise
its impact on the ground to keep an elegant
line that opens up in the sky. The building
is designed with a minimum footprint to
maximise the plaza and the landscape area.
The ground floor is a total open space and
allow the visitors, tourists to circulate freely
under, through and around the building.
Open circulation and accessible roof
Some steps make the mosque level directly
accessible from the public space. These
“steps to heaven” are leading to a roof top
terrace – viewpoint and praying platform.
Vertical circulations form the main core of the
building for rapid and disable access. Within
the main mosque areas, perimeter staircases
within the double walls give access to
each platform/balcony. The main landscape
is stepping and designed with water feature,
mineral bands, green planted areas that provide
shadow, and cooling. Many transversal
bridges connect the bands. A central axis allows
the visitors to gather and connect. The
whole landscape is designed as a promenade
and fluid space, based on the radial masterplan
lines.

A retreat

The mosque internal space is envisaged as a
retreat from the rest of urban city.

A shift

The whole project is built on a grid shift: the
urban symmetrical axis together with the essential
necessity to orientate to Mecca direction.
The steps, patterns, tiling make a shift
to guide the visitors. The global geometry is
symmetrical, but the main inner praying hall
follows the Mecca direction. Experiencing the
space within, the outer symmetrical world is
then paused for a spiritual and religious time.

Universal quasicrystal geometry

The inner space is designed as a unique universe,
a place of connection and silence. It
is a place of orientation and projection. The
patterns are inspired by the quasicrystal grids
that dominate and is the essence of traditional
islamic architecture.

Pattern as abstract representation

The Qibla wall as a deep wall façade is designed
with the pattern of the arabesque,
without a beginning or an end, portrays this
sense of infinity, and is the best means to
describe in art the doctrine of “Divine Unity.”
Repeated over and over again, seemingly
exponentially, these geometric patterns aim
at inspiring a sense of cosmic harmony. The
layout of the perforations is designed to control
the amount of light that enters the space
so that interesting patterns of light and shadow
animate the space and activates connection
with the spiritual world. The special light
created through the thickness and pattern of
Qibla wall is the light of knowledge.

Sustainability: target and opportunity

The project seizes the opportunity to build a
self-efficient building model using traditional
and cutting edge technology. The building
services and environmental design has been
developed as a seamless part of the building’s
architecture to create a perfectly integrated
design. The aim is to create a building
where the environmental systems blend into
the background, without the intrusive noise
and space requirements of traditional air-conditioning
systems.

Natural ventilation - wind catcher

The sloped and curved building is designed
not only to reduce the enormous solar radiation
penetrating into the buildings as shading,
but also to generate air movement in the enormous
volume of air cavity. The tip and edge
of the buildings will be perforated to capture
wind at the edge. In traditional mosque architecture,
the building would consist of a tower
with large open windows that would allow for
cold air to enter, and a dome in the center of
the building that would have an opening in
the ceiling that would both accumulate and
allow warm air to leave the building through a
cupola.

Photovoltaic panels

Photovoltaic panels convert solar energy into
electrical current which can be used to power
elements of the building such as lighting and
air conditioning equipments etc. High performance
photovoltaic cells will be installed on
the layer of the roof. Photovoltaic cells also
create shading which will cut off the direct solar
radiation to the surfaces of the buildings
beneath the roof. This will help reduce the
cooling load.

Microclimate control

Trees can protect the microclimate from unnecessary
solar gain. They can also generate
evaporation which makes people feel cooler
and relaxation. This will reduce people’s comfort
level higher.
Evaporative cooling is a physical phenomenon
in which evaporation of a liquid, typically
into surrounding air, cools an object or a liquid
in contact with it. The greater the difference
between the two temperatures is, the greater
the evaporative cooling effect is. As the water
vaporizes, the `pond` also works as a natural
cooling device.

Base geometry definition

The base geometry of the outer shape is
based on simple geometry principles. The curvature
is based on two generating straight
lines forming a ruled surface. In geometry, a
surface R is ruled if through every point of R
there is a straight line that lies on R. A ruled
surface can be described as the set of points
swept by a moving straight line. For example,
a cone is formed by keeping one point of
a line fixed whilst moving another point along
a circle. A surface is doubly ruled if through
every one of its points there are two distinct
lines that lie on the surface. The hyperbolic
paraboloid and the hyperboloid of one sheet
are doubly ruled surfaces.

Ruled surface reference inspiration

Ruled surfaces made a significant impact
in modern architecture, not only since the
pioneering works of A. Gaudí and V. Shukhov,
but as well in the concrete expressionist
structure work as the work built by Candela
or Nervi. The early work on minimum surface
engaged by Frei Otto contributed to understand
forms from nature and the form finding
process. There are many aspects in relation
to the form economy, optimisation, and
constructability that provide architectural
and structural elegance.
The geometry of the Mosque outer shape
refers to this work background mentionned.
The cable layout drapping and restraining
the core of the Creek tower project are per
definition describing a ruled surface that inspire
the mosque geometry.

Structure

High performance concrete

The main building frame is a high performance
concrete frame. Specific concrete fibre
is envisaged in order to optimise sections
and create elegant structure. It creates realistic
assumptions of achieving substantial
effect from the perspective of combined material
and energy savings. Ductal or similar
is an ultra high performance concrete reinforced
by organic or steel fibres within the
UHPFRC family.
Compression resistance and post tension
Specific section can be then post tensionned in
order to take advantage of the high compressive
stress capacity of the material (around
180 MPa). Due to the form of the project, it is
expected high tension in the horizontal elements
and a significant push pull force in the
core. The use of postensionning is a strategy
to explore to limit tension and cracking.
Local plants and local material
It is envisaged to use a local plant with local
sand. Sourcing locally is a sustainable strategy
in order to minimise long distance transport.
Local sand is as well envisaged for the
finishing and all hard landscape tiling.
Structural system and stability
The mosque building has a transversal triangular
shape as an inverted pyramid in section.
It does minimise the site footprint and
creates a dramatic wing form within the landscape.
In elevation the building is slopped and
the roof is then accessible, and cantilevering.
The V shape is stabilised by the central cores
connected with horizontal diaphragms. The
inclined walls are partially doubled with internal
stairs providing out of plane inertia to the
whole section. The external form is exposed
concrete cladded with PV so that the whole
surface is an energy efficient surface. Three
levels of underground parking are forming a
base under the landscape and create a stiff
base for the whole building.

 

https://www.emaar.com/assets/pdf/Iconic-Mosque-DCH-Design-Breif.pdf

https://www.emaar.com/en/what-we-do/communities/uae/dubai-creek-harbour/

https://de-de.facebook.com/emaardubai/videos/design-competition/2099597230277236/